Fruits and spices in Mauritian cuisine

The island of Mauritius has a unique blend of different ethnicities that have all had an influence on the island’s cuisine.

Pineapple and watermelon sandwich with cinnamon French toast

Pineapple and watermelon sandwich with cinnamon French toast

The African, Indian, Asian and European influences are evident in the delicious, spicy cuisine of the region. Creole pickles and fried vegetables sit alongside spicy Indian curries, Chinese noodles and European inspired dishes.

Here is our run down of 5 of the most popular fruits and spices used in Mauritian cuisine and some inspirational recipes created by our Constance Chefs.

1. Pineapple

Pineapple is one of the many fruits that grows all year round in the tropical climate of Mauritius. Freshly picked pineapple is always available at local markets and street stalls on the island, and pineapple sprinkled with chilli salt is a popular Mauritian snack. Watch our video for how to peel a pineapple and add the chilli salt.

2. Mango

There are over 50 different varieties of mango in Mauritius, the most common being the Maison Rouge, Baissac and Dauphine. Each has a slightly different flavour and colour and all are enjoyed as snacks or ingredients in local recipes.

Pan-fried sea bass with mild spices, salad of warm spinach, asparagus and berries

Pan-fried sea bass with mild spices, salad of warm spinach, asparagus and berries

3. Turmeric

A popular spice in Indian and Pakistani cuisine, turmeric has become an important spice in Mauritius. The island also provides the perfect conditions for growing the spice, which is part of the ginger family.

4. Chillies

The gentle heat of chillies, including the cari chilli, permeates much of Mauritian cooking. With influences from the spice-rich foods of India, Asia and Africa, chilli plays an important role in both savoury and sweet dishes.

5. Cardamom

One of the world’s most expensive spices by weight, cardamom is native of India, Nepal and Bhutan and is often used to add a rich warmth to curries.

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