A guide to fishing in Madagascar

The remote ocean to the northwest of Madagascar with its combinations of reefs, banks and drop-offs is a haven for large numbers of pelagic and reef fish.

Fishing in Madagascar

Fishing in Madagascar

Whether you dream of saltwater fly fishing for a Marlin, trolling for Dogtooth Tuna or trying your hand at the traditional Malagasy net casting, the waters of Madagascar are an angler’s paradise.

Fishing is good almost all year round (with the exception of February and March) but April to July is the peak season when many more Sailfish and Marlin pass through the waters.

Big game fishing

Pit your wits against the giant game fish in the clear, calm waters of Madagascar and you could find yourself pulling any of the big prize fish – Marlin, Sailfish, Yellowfin Tuna, Dorado, Wahoo – from the waves.

Read more about big game fishing in Madagascar.

Fly fishing

Catch of the day

Catch of the day

Fly fishing is possible from a boat, with some operators specialising in catching billfish such as Marlin and Sailfish on fly or alternatively from standing on a reef. Reef fish include GTs, snappers and grouper.

Traditional Malagasy net casting

On the private island of Constance Tsarabanjina to the northwest of Madagascar you can try your hand at traditional net casting from a pirogue (a wooden fishing boat). Fish the way the locals here have for hundreds of years and then bring your catch back to shore and the chefs at Tsarabanjina will prepare and cook it for you.

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Working with local fishermen at Constance Tsarabanjina

At Constance Tsarabanjina, Madagascar you can enjoy fresh fish caught from the ocean in the same traditional way it has been for hundreds of years.

Local fisherman in his pirogue

Local fisherman in his pirogue

One of the many delights you’ll discover on the remote Madagascan island of Tsarabanjina is watching the daily arrival of the local fishermen delivering their catch to our chefs.

Mitsio fishermen

The fishermen live on the neighbouring island of Mitsio, the only other inhabited island in the archipelago, and they travel and fish in traditional boats called pirogues.

The pirogues are hollowed out wooden boats powered by oars. It’s from here that the fishermen cast their nets into the waters around the archipelago. Following the catch they make the 3 to 4 hour journey to Tsarabanjina.

Fishing in pirogues has been a way of life in Madagascar for hundreds of years with fishermen teaching the family craft to their children, and passing their skills down through the generations.

We at Constance are proud to support such a long held tradition and our guests enjoy the freshest fish caught from just beyond our own shores.

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