The world’s most exclusive diving experience at Constance Halaveli

Visit Constance Halaveli and indulge in the most exclusive, deluxe dive experience ever conceived.

Diving at Constance

Diving at Constance

TGI Diving Maldives in collaboration with Constance Halaveli and Sultan’s of the Sea have created a diving experience that is second to none.

Step aboard the luxury 20-metre yacht for 24-hours of luxury living and incredible diving at some of the Maldives’ most exciting dive sites spread over several stunning atolls.

With up to four of you able to enjoy your stay onboard the Azimut yacht, there’ll be a personal chef, dive instructor, massage therapist and videographer to make sure you have the experience of a lifetime.

The Azimut yacht will be entirely yours for 24 hours so you can choose to sleep aboard in the sumptuous luxury of the yacht’s cabins, or return to your villa at Halaveli. To book the exclusive diving experience, email TGI Diving Maldives directly at Constance Halaveli: dive@halaveli.com

Step on board the Azimut yacht

Upon arrival you’ll be greeted by your own dive instructor, and a personal chef who will prepare a breakfast of fresh truffles, King of Kings Beluga Caviar, Alaskan King Crab Legs, smoked Wild Balik Salmon (fewer than 1,000 fillets are produced each year) and Manuka Honey.

Then it’s time to set sail and encounter the diverse marine life and stunning underwater world that surrounds Constance Halaveli. You can expect to encounter whale sharks, mantas, reef sharks, Pyramid Butterfly fish, moray eels, hawksbill turtles and more.

Visibility is excellent in the Maldives, making this a diver’s paradise whether you are experienced or just making your first foray into diving.

Post dive massage and champagne celebration

Spa at Constance Hotels & Resorts

Massage treatment

Take time out between dives as you cruise the atolls and enjoy a sumptuous massage from your onboard spa therapist or soak up the sunshine while enjoying canapés of caramelised foie gras, Waygu beef burgers, wild finger limes, wild strawberries and Fritz Knipschildt’s Chocopolagie.

Savour the memory of your dives with a glass or two of chilled Dom Perignon or Crystal Rose before a light snack of Golden Almla Caviar and oysters accompanied by a Francisco Gomez, Gold Edition Sauvignon Blanc as you cruise back towards Halaveli.

5* dinner on board or at your own desert island

Then watch the sun set while savouring a sumptuous 5* dinner prepared by your chef and served either aboard the yacht or at a table set up on Alikoi, your own private desert island under the stars.

Highlights of the six-course dinner menu will include:

  • Hand-dived Bay Scallops
  • Buda’s Hand Yuzu
  • Wild Bush limes
  • Kobe beef
  • Blue Maine Lobster
  • Dessert prepared with Hennessey XO
Diving at Constance Moofushi, Maldives

Diving in The Maldives

Wines including:

  • Pomerol, Château Petrus, 1997, the most expensive red wine in the world
  • Champagne Carbon, 2006, bottled in carbon and created by artisan sommelier Phillippe Jamesse, the best sommelier of champagne

Preparing your equipment before the trip

All diving equipment from Mare’s most exclusive premium range will be selected by you before your arrival in Maldives, and fitted to your exact size and then air freighted to the Maldives to await your arrival.

Fitted premium Mares dive equipment includes:

  • Regulator: Instinct 12S
  • BCD: Hybrid Pro Tec
  • Dive Computer: Matrix or the Matrix HD Air Integrated
  • Wetsuit: Mares Reef full or shorty
  • Mares Equator booties
  • Mares X-streams fins
  • Mares Liquid Skin mask
  • Mares Eos 10R dive torch
  • Mares Strobe Beam
  • Mares Cruise Backpack Pro
  • Mares Dry Bag
  • Mares Cruise Safety
  • Nautilus life line
Constance Halaveli, Maldives

Constance Halaveli, Maldives

To book the world’s most exclusive diving experience

Email TGI Diving Maldives directly at Constance Halaveli: dive@halaveli.com

Find out more

 

Sea creatures of the Maldives: the Pyramid Butterflyfish

Marine biologist Robin Aieilo shares her insight about the sea creatures of the Maldives and the beautiful Pyramid Butterflyfish found in the calm water around Constance Halaveli.

Butterflyfish in the Indian Ocean

The varied fish in the reefs around Halaveli

I can’t believe it has been over a month since I left Halaveli Resort – I had such a fantastic time and cannot wait until I return in the near future.

Arctic Adventure

But before I come back to the resort I have another exciting adventure – 3 months sailing above the Arctic Circle. I will be onboard a small Expedition Cruiseship working as a marine biologist lecturer and zodiac driver (you know those small black rubber boats). We are exploring around Svalbard, Norway for over amonth then making our way across the Atlantic to Iceland, Greenland and then into Hudson Bay.

This will be my fifth season up there – for me, it is a little like coming home for a visit every year. So stay tuned – I will be writing monthly blogs from the Arctic and sharing my experiences with polar bears, whales, walrus and the northern lights.

Ongoing Marine Life Blogs

But my heart remains in the Maldives… There are just so many fascinating animals to tell you about. This month, it’s the turn of the Pyramid Butterflyfish.

Pyramid Butterflyfish (Hemitaurichthys polylepis)

When you get into the waters on any of the reefs around Halaveli Island, the first thing that catches your eye is colour – splashes of blue, yellow, white, orange, black. Fish of every shape and size darting around you – sometimes so quickly that you only see a flash of colour, then the tail as it disappears into the reef.

Sometimes it is almost overwhelming – where should you look first?

Butterflyfish in the reefs around Halaveli

A Butterflyfish in the Indian Ocean

Beautiful Butterflyfish

One of my favourite fish of all is the butterflyfish. They are aptly named because they are small, colourful and ‘flit’ around the reef. There are 32 species in the Maldives and as a group, they are relatively easy to identify.

They are hand-sized, laterally compressed (discus-shaped), swim in pairs (they mate for life, which can be about 25 to 30 years), and generally cruise along close to the reef as they feed by nipping off coral polyps and grabbing tiny invertebrates.

Their shape is perfect for quick maneuvering – they can turn and dash off in milliseconds – and for tucking into little nooks and crannies in search of food.

Almost all butterflyfish (there are, of course, exceptions) are white and yellow with black stripes. They are certainly striking, and hard to miss. Most of them have two key deceptive features – black eye-stripes that hide their real eyes, and what we call ‘false eyespots’ near their tails. The theory behind these eyespots is that they confuse predators into thinking the fish is moving in the opposite direction, making it harder to attack.

The Black Sheep of the Family

But, as with all families, there is one that is the ‘black sheep’ – the one that behaves and looks a little bit different. In this case, it is the Pyramid Butterflyfish.

Instead of cruising near the reef in pairs, these colourful fish form massive groups, or schools, just off the edge of the reef. They can form groups of many hundreds of fish, forming a beautiful shifting curtain of black, yellow and white.

Butterflyfish

A school of Butterflyfish

Planktivores

This species does not feed on reef invertebrates like the other butterflyfish, but is a planktivore – eating zooplankton (small animals that float in the water). So, for them, it is better to hang out in the open water where there is more current and more plankton.

The other difference is that this species does not have the typical black stripes of other butterfly species. Instead, they have a large triangular shaped white patch on either side. Young fish have lighter coloured heads, and they darken as they mature.

At dusk, this large school of fish disperses – each individual fish wanders off over the reef looking for a small hole to use as a hiding place for the night while they sleep. Just before entering the hole they change colour – the bright white patch fades away and turns dark, making them less visible to nocturnal hunters such as sharks and moray eels.

How Pyramid Butterfly fish communicate

Scientists have only recently discovered that just before they head off to find their nighttime refuge, and only at this time, they communicate with one another. How? By sound! Yes…many fish are able to make sounds by using their air bladders and the muscles that surround it like a drum. So the next time you do a dusk dive or snorkel, listen carefully to these beautiful little Pyramid Butterflyfish.

Find out more

Learn more about other sea creatures you’ll see when diving at Halaveli: