Indulge in the ultimate spa holiday at Halaveli

Indulge in a spa holiday at Constance Halaveli and you’ll enter a world where the relentless pace of life gently slips away.

Spa de Constance

Spa de Constance

This haven in the North Ari Atoll offers a huge range of treatments to pamper and revive your senses.

In its 2013 Spa Guide, Condé Nast Traveller described the spa at Constance Halaveli:

‘At the overwater spa… rejuvenate your jaded spirit and zap negative energy…’

Personal consultation

Indulge in a Wellness Consultation in which one of our team of qualified therapists will design a series of treatments specifically for you as part of a holistic journey of healing which may include everything from massage, nutrition, skincare and fitness.

Treatment rooms

Whatever treatment combo is devised for you, you’ll feel an innate sense of relaxation in the cool mahogany treatment rooms, where the open sides invite the ocean breeze and the massage table looks down to a glass panel below so you can watch the marine life swimming beneath you.

Ila at Halaveli

The organic, natural products created by Ila are sourced from plants or minerals carefully selected from around the world such as the Himalayan rock salt from Kashmir, rosehip seed oil from Southern Andes and Babassu oil from the Amazon.

Relax in the private spa pool overlooking the ocean

Relax in the private spa pool overlooking the ocean

Highlights include:

The Ila experience

Combining facial techniques, a Himalayan rock salt body scrub, Manipura massage, reflexology and lymphatic-drainage this complete experience aims to re-awaken the body and spirit inviting a sense of euphoric calm.

The Valmont Spa

Exclusive Swiss skincare and anti-ageing specialist Valmont has its own spa at Halaveli offering treatments that blend the purity of Swiss ingredients with the very latest scientific breakthroughs in skincare treatment.

Highlights include:

Snow Bright Radiance Ritual

Restoring the natural uniformity of youthful skin this treatment uses vitamin C and white lupine extract to blend away small vascular anomalies and larger pigmentary spots leaving the skin with a radiant glow.

Spa de Constance

‘From skin to within’ is our maxim at Spa de Constance, Halaveli. We use only handcrafted natural ingredients, many sourced locally in the Maldives, blended into our own custom made oils, scrubs and wraps to create an enveloping sensory experience for your body and mind.

Foot treatments at Spa de Constance

Foot treatments at Spa de Constance

Pamper your senses with a full body massage, scrub, bath soak or wrap – or why not combine all three in one of our Skin to Within Experiences.

Highlights include:

Meditative Indulgence

A sumptuous 4-hand massage featuring oils of frankincense, rosewood and lime inducing a deep-level of relaxation.

Relax after your treatments

Feel your body detox in our sauna and steam room and then rejuvenate your senses with a refreshing dip in the spa’s outdoor hot and cool pools with views out across the turquoise waters, or take the wooden steps down and bathe in the ocean below.

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Last chance to vote for Halaveli in the World Luxury Hotel Awards

There’s still one week left to cast your vote for Constance Halaveli in the World Luxury Hotel Awards 2013.

Relaxing in the pool at the Presidential Villa

Relaxing in the pool at the Presidential Villa

VOTE NOW for Constance Halaveli

Voting continues until Friday 26 July 2013.

At Halaveli we have created a sumptuous luxury experience around the natural beauty of the island where spacious water villas float above turquoise waters and elegant beach villas open onto powder white sand.

In celebrating the ‘pinnacle of achievement for luxury hotels’ we hope the World Luxury Hotel Awards will recognise Halaveli in 2013.

VOTE NOW for Constance Halaveli in the World Luxury Hotel Awards

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Winner of our Name the Sea Creature competition

Thanks to everyone who entered our Name the Sea Creature competition, to give pet names to some of the marine life found in the ocean around Halaveli.

Manta Rays at Constance Moofushi

Manta Rays at Constance Hotels and Resorts

The winner of the Valmont Fit and Tone set is:

  • Ramreka Akshay

And the winner of the bonus prize, a Constance USB memory stick is:

  • Shaheen Ruhomaully

Congratulations to you both. Please send us a direct message through Facebook so we can organise delivery of your prizes.

Watch this space for more competitions to come, or visit us on our Constance Hotels & Resorts Facebook page.

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The Moray Eel – love them or loathe them?

Marine biologist and guest blogger Robin Aiello takes a look at the much maligned Moray Eel in this month’s creature feature.

The Moray Eel

The Moray Eel

Robin will be returning to Constance Halaveli in September 2013, to run further dive courses and talks following her hugely popular visit earlier in the year.

You either love moray eels, or fear them.

Over the years moray eels have gained an unearned reputation as an aggressive, ferocious animal. In truth, however, they are reclusive and shy, preferring to flee or hide from divers by pulling into reef crevices.

How the moray breathes

Despite their long, snake-like appearance, moray eels are fish – not snakes. And like all fish, they need to have fresh seawater pass over their gills to breath. But, since morays are relatively sedentary fish, hiding in ambush to catch prey like crabs, octopus and fish, they have developed another way to ‘breathe’ – they gulp water by opening and closing their mouths. Many people misinterpret this behaviour as ferocious and a sign of aggression – but it is merely the eel’s way of breathing.

Their elongated, serpentine shape allows these fish to swim through the complex reef framework of nooks and crannies. To avoid getting cut and scraped by sharp coral, they produce huge amounts of mucus to coat their smooth, scaleless skin.

Marine biologist, Robin Aiello

Marine biologist, Robin Aiello

How moray eels catch their prey

When you look at the head of a moray eel their ‘beady’ little eyes seem disproportionately small. In fact, morays have very poor eyesight, and are nearly blind. So how do they find their food? By following their nose. They have a highly developed sense of smell and large tubular nostrils for smelling prey. They also have very good hearing, which helps them to hunt.

But what I personally think is the most amazing thing about morays eels is how they catch and eat their prey. In addition to several rows of razor sharp teeth, these fish have a unique weapon that, so far, scientists have not found in any other animal – a second set of jaws!

These jaws, called pharyngeal jaws, lie inside the fish’s throat, and when the mouth is opened to attack, they are propelled forward into the mouth to grasp the prey. As the mouth closes again, they pull back into the throat, taking the prey with them! How weird and amazing is that?

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Top tips for food and wine pairing

Matching the perfect wine with the perfect food to bring out the subtle, distinctive flavours of both is a delicate skill.

Chablis, “Terroir de Courgis”

Chablis, “Terroir de Courgis”

Here Constance Halaveli sommelier Cedric Jacobs selects his favourite wines and, with the help of executive chef at Halaveli Holger Joost, pairs them with a selection of delectable dishes.

1. Chablis, “Terroir de Courgis”, Patrick Piuze, 2010, France, Burgundy

I will always remember the first time I tasted this wine, I was in Bordeaux in 2011 for a famous wine exposition and a friend of Jerome Faure brought a few bottles from this producer to be blind-tasted. When the results came back, it was like I was back in school with my lecturer warning me that Chablis can be confused with wine from the Loire Valley due to the proximity of Terroir.

Courgis is the western city of the Chablis appellation and very close to Pouilly Fumé – a total confusion, yet an incredible discovery.

100 per cent Chardonnay – The hint of gunflint, citrus & exotic fruit and minerality could confuse the drinker with a Sauvignon Blanc. Showing an amazing purity in the mouth, a juicy, rich mineral wine with a perfect respect of the fruit.

Food Pairing:

Some time ago, the executive chef prepared prawns in 3 textures (seared, sous vide and tartar) served with mango salsa for me to taste. This would have been the perfect wine to drink to respect both of the wine and dish.

Chef Pairing:

Tiger Prawns in 3 textures (seared, sous vide and tartar) with mango and palm heart salsa curry emulsion.

VDP des Bouches du Rhône, Villa Minna

VDP des Bouches du Rhône, Villa Minna

2. VDP des Bouches du Rhône, Villa Minna, Red, 2007, France, Provence

This wine comes from the commune of Saint Cannat, a few kilometres from Aix-en-Provence and neighbour of the small village I am from, Ventabren. I discovered the wine from Jean Paul Luc 8 years ago when I started my sommelier formation. Unfortunately, it wasn’t that easy to bring to the middle of the Indian Ocean. Eventually, the wines arrived and my love for them did not change at all.

A bold blend between Cabernet Sauvignon, Syrah and Mourvèdre. The nose is crammed full of black cherry, almost kirsches, and dried fig aromas. After few minutes of aeration in the glass, violets, mixed Provençal herbs and spices are showing off. The mouth is fruitful and complex offering a beautiful freshness for a 2007 vintage showing that this wine still has guts to age even more.

Food Pairing:

Halaveli cheese selection – a selection of international cheeses with dried fruit, crackers & honey.

As a typical French man I cannot refuse a piece of cheese but being in the middle of the Indian ocean I do not have access to it that easily. I discovered here a Brie from Australia, the Jindi Triple Cream, battered more than a normal one and showing an incredible complexity. I could simply spend a whole night with friends pairing these two.

Waterkloof, Sauvignon Blanc

Waterkloof, Sauvignon Blanc

3. Waterkloof, Sauvignon Blanc, 2010 – South Africa, Stellenbosh

I discovered this wine in October 2012 while visiting South Africa, more precisely the Cape Wine wine exposition in Cape Town. The first contact was with Paul Boutinot, the owner of the winery, and then his son Louis, who invited us to taste his wine.

The Waterkloof Sauvignon Blanc is one of my ‘Coup de Coeur’ of the year for the purity that is present in this wine. A rich and complex Sauvignon Blanc offering citrus fruit, vegetal and fennel aromas on the nose for a mineral, salty, and long lasting finish – a great complexity for an easy drinking wine.

Food Pairing:

Halaveli Sushi and Sashimi selection with pickled ginger and soy.

Minerality and saltiness lead me directly to products from the sea and one of my first experiences with the Waterkloof, and the most memorable, was with Japanese Food: Sushi, Sashimi, Californian Roll… This unctuous wine matched perfectly these Japanese specialties.

4. Mullineux, “Granit”, Syrah, 2010 – South Africa, Swartland

Like the Waterkloof, this was a discovery that happened in South Africa during my last trip. We were welcomed by Andrea and Chris Mullineux in a restaurant called “French toast” in the city of Cape Town.

The cuvée Granit is, for me, majestic. The nose offers beautiful black berries, olive, spices and meaty aromas. On the palate, the wine is fresh, lively and spicy with an amazing fruit – the feeling of literally biting into berries. A feminine, yet complex Syrah which deserves to be aged for couple of years, but can be enjoyed right now.

Food Pairing:

Tuna steak and caramelized foie gras, warm salad of Shimeji, Edamame and tomato, celeriac puree.

Living in the Maldives for the past few years, tuna, the meatiest fish of the Indian Ocean, has become one of my favourite dishes. To complement this amazing fish, The Mullineux Syrah is a perfect match, especially when the tuna steak is served with a typical olive tapenade, grilled Mediterranean vegetables and a celeriac purée.

Barolo, Attilio Ghisolfi

Barolo, Attilio Ghisolfi

5. Barolo, Attilio Ghisolfi, 2005 – Italy, Piedmont

My most recent trip was to Italy where we visited mostly the north of the country seeking out small yet amazing winemakers. I had already worked with the wines from Attilio Ghisolfi for the last 2 years (in fact, Jerome Faure discovered them during a tasting in Italy a few years back) but I wanted to meet the man behind the superb bottle.

Cherry, balsamic, olive and chamomile all together coming to your nose for an amazing mouthful, this 100 per cent Nebbiolo is similar to a Pinot Noir but with firm Tannin – This wine from Attilio Ghisolfi, after a long and delicate aging in the cellar, shows beautiful and melted tannins, with impressive fruit – Can be kept for aging for another 10 to 15 years.

Food Pairing:
Angus beef tenderloin, Asian spiced spinach, truffle potato and horseradish crème.

Red meat is the first dish that comes to my mind when having a bottle of Barolo in front of me. More exactly, a nice, juicy Angus beef tenderloin, served in its own jus with a homemade truffle potato purée and horseradish cream.

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Marine biologist journeys to the Arctic North

Marine biologist Robin Aiello visited Constance Halaveli earlier this year, where she ran a number of dive courses and talks. Currently in the Arctic North, Robin writes about her latest expedition.

Walrus' relaxing in the Arctic

Walrus’ relaxing in the Arctic

Greetings from the far north – the land of polar bears and walrus

I can assure you that right now, having just spent the past 8 hours driving a small rubber boat though thick sea ice in -1°C temperatures, I am dreaming of the warm tropical waters of Halaveli in the Maldives.

Expedition in Svalbard

I am up here in Svalbard, in the far North, above 79º latitude, working as the marine biologist on-board an expedition ship that is spending three months exploring the Arctic. So far, the season has been wonderful.

Polar bears and ice caps

The other day we started the morning with a male polar bear walking leisurely past our ship as we drifted in thick sea ice that spreads out as far as the eye can see. Polar bears are amazing animals with their huge paws, shaggy white coat of fur and piercing black eyes. They are just so regal and elegant – kings of the ice.

A Polar Bear

A Polar Bear

Later in the day we visited a beach with a dozen or so walrus hauled out. They are so funny – they lie for long periods of time doing absolutely nothing, then suddenly one will wiggle around, which starts a whole flurry of activity as they raise their heads, knock into one another with their tusks, until they slowly find a more comfortable position and settle back down to sleep some more.

As beautiful and dramatic as the scenery here is, I cannot wait to return to Halaveli in September to dive and snorkel the amazing reefs.

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Polar Bear

Up close and personal

 

Admiring the reflection

Admiring the reflection

 

A stroll on the ice

A stroll on the ice