Top 5 tips for long haul flights

Arrive at your hotel feeling refreshed with our top tips for long haul travel from Sophie Demaret our Spa Manager at Constance Le Prince Maurice.

Sea plane landing at Constance Moofushi

Sea plane landing at Moofushi

1. Before flying, use compression socks. They may not look sexy but they’re effective and will go unnoticed.

2. When you’re on the plane, avoid crossing your legs as it restricts your circulation.

3. During the flight, get up and move around. Taking just a few steps can help to revive your blood circulation.

4. Rub your ankles and then rotate them, first one way and then the other.

5. Massage your feet with a tennis ball that you roll under each foot – you’ll feel the benefits immediately.

Finally, once you’ve arrived at your hotel, head to the spa. At Le Prince Maurice, you can enjoy a cold shower on your legs, regenerate yourself with a sandalwood and cane sugar scrub, then follow it up with a 45 minute reflexology session. It will leave your legs feeling light and refreshed.

Your tips for jet lag

Do you have any tips for dealing with jet lag? Leave a comment here or visit us on Facebook.

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Visit our website to find out more about the 5* Constance Le Prince Maurice, Mauritius

 

Paul Wesselingh wins ISPS Championship

English golfer Paul Wesselingh stormed to victory for the second year running at this years’ ISPS Handa PGA Seniors Championship.

Links golf course, Constance Belle Mare Plage, Mauritius

Links golf course, Constance Belle Mare Plage, Mauritius

Held at Mottram Hall in Cheshire last week, Wesslingh produced a stunning 20 under par total, including a flawless final round, to hold off all challengers and take the ISPS Championship.

The win sees Wesselingh climb to the top of the Senior Tour Order of Merit putting him in a strong position to make it to the MCB Tour Championship held at Constance Belle Mare Plage, Mauritius in December.

Wesselingh was reported as saying, ‘It’s unbelievable, I just can’t believe I’ve done it. Couldn’t believe I’d done it last year and I can’t believe I’ve done it again this year.’

Challenging Wesselingh for the top spot was Paraguay’s Angel Franco coming in second with 16 under par and fellow Englishman Ian Woosnam who came in third.

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Constance Ephélia: Adventure and luxury in the Seychelles

Imagine a holiday where you can enjoy indulgent luxury alongside a raft of exciting activities.

Climbing in a luxury setting at the Constance Ephelia Resort, Seychelles

Climbing in a luxury setting at the Constance Ephelia Resort, Seychelles

At Constance Ephélia on the island of Mahé in the Seychelles you’ll find stunning beaches and an elegant, restful spa on one side of the resort, with zip wires and climbing walls on the other.

Ephélia on Expresso

As Leigh-Anne Williams from South African TV breakfast show Expresso pointed out on a recent visit to Ephélia, the Seychelles is famous for its Creole cuisine and at Ephélia it is given a sumptuous 5-star twist.

Even the cocktails here are specially created, inspired by fresh local juices and rums infused with tastes of the Seychelles, cinnamon and lemon.

Spa Village at Ephélia

Embracing the lush beauty of the island and the natural stone and flora we have managed to transfer the peaceful, laid back vibe of the island to our impressive Spa Village.

Shiseido Spa at Constance Ephelia Resort, Seychelles

Shiseido Spa at Constance Ephelia Resort, Seychelles

Lie back and breathe in the aroma of natural ingredients sourced on the island and used in traditional treatments at the impressive 5,000sqm Spa de Constance. Or for a dash of extra luxury pamper your skin with Japanese specialities at the Shiseido Spa.

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Count down to Mauritius golf championship begins

The 2013 European Senior Tour golf championship season kicked off to a dramatic start last week, with Peter Senior placing an impressive 11th place at the US Senior PGA Championship at Bellerive, Missouri.

Legend golf course, Constance Belle Mare Plage, Mauritius

Legend golf course, Constance Belle Mare Plage

The European Senior Tour will culminate in December with the MCB Tour Championship played on the Links and Legend golf courses at Constance Belle Mare Plage in Mauritius.

Also present at Bellerive was last year’s surprise US Senior PGA Championship winner, British golfer Roger Chapman. Despite attempts to defend his title Chapman finished a disappointing 79 to end in a share of 64th.

More on 2013 European Senior Tour

More on US Senior PGA Championship

Golf blogger rates Legend and Links golf courses in Mauritius

Golf blogger and writer David Gilroy raves about the courses at Constance Belle Mare Plage in Mauritius.

Luxury golf holidays at Constance Hotels & Resorts

Luxury golf holidays at Constance Hotels & Resorts

Gilroy, who is writing a book about the correlation between improving your game and improving your business, found the championship Links and Legend courses an enticing challenge.

He was particularly impressed with the knowledge shown by his caddie:

‘My caddie was called Miguel (8 handicapper)… Within five holes he was handing me clubs without any discussion and with only one exception he was right every time. He knew when to chat, when to keep quiet and got me round in 5 over par.’

Read more about David Gilroy’s visit to Belle Mare Plage:

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Sea creatures of the Maldives: the Pyramid Butterflyfish

Marine biologist Robin Aieilo shares her insight about the sea creatures of the Maldives and the beautiful Pyramid Butterflyfish found in the calm water around Constance Halaveli.

Butterflyfish in the Indian Ocean

The varied fish in the reefs around Halaveli

I can’t believe it has been over a month since I left Halaveli Resort – I had such a fantastic time and cannot wait until I return in the near future.

Arctic Adventure

But before I come back to the resort I have another exciting adventure – 3 months sailing above the Arctic Circle. I will be onboard a small Expedition Cruiseship working as a marine biologist lecturer and zodiac driver (you know those small black rubber boats). We are exploring around Svalbard, Norway for over amonth then making our way across the Atlantic to Iceland, Greenland and then into Hudson Bay.

This will be my fifth season up there – for me, it is a little like coming home for a visit every year. So stay tuned – I will be writing monthly blogs from the Arctic and sharing my experiences with polar bears, whales, walrus and the northern lights.

Ongoing Marine Life Blogs

But my heart remains in the Maldives… There are just so many fascinating animals to tell you about. This month, it’s the turn of the Pyramid Butterflyfish.

Pyramid Butterflyfish (Hemitaurichthys polylepis)

When you get into the waters on any of the reefs around Halaveli Island, the first thing that catches your eye is colour – splashes of blue, yellow, white, orange, black. Fish of every shape and size darting around you – sometimes so quickly that you only see a flash of colour, then the tail as it disappears into the reef.

Sometimes it is almost overwhelming – where should you look first?

Butterflyfish in the reefs around Halaveli

A Butterflyfish in the Indian Ocean

Beautiful Butterflyfish

One of my favourite fish of all is the butterflyfish. They are aptly named because they are small, colourful and ‘flit’ around the reef. There are 32 species in the Maldives and as a group, they are relatively easy to identify.

They are hand-sized, laterally compressed (discus-shaped), swim in pairs (they mate for life, which can be about 25 to 30 years), and generally cruise along close to the reef as they feed by nipping off coral polyps and grabbing tiny invertebrates.

Their shape is perfect for quick maneuvering – they can turn and dash off in milliseconds – and for tucking into little nooks and crannies in search of food.

Almost all butterflyfish (there are, of course, exceptions) are white and yellow with black stripes. They are certainly striking, and hard to miss. Most of them have two key deceptive features – black eye-stripes that hide their real eyes, and what we call ‘false eyespots’ near their tails. The theory behind these eyespots is that they confuse predators into thinking the fish is moving in the opposite direction, making it harder to attack.

The Black Sheep of the Family

But, as with all families, there is one that is the ‘black sheep’ – the one that behaves and looks a little bit different. In this case, it is the Pyramid Butterflyfish.

Instead of cruising near the reef in pairs, these colourful fish form massive groups, or schools, just off the edge of the reef. They can form groups of many hundreds of fish, forming a beautiful shifting curtain of black, yellow and white.

Butterflyfish

A school of Butterflyfish

Planktivores

This species does not feed on reef invertebrates like the other butterflyfish, but is a planktivore – eating zooplankton (small animals that float in the water). So, for them, it is better to hang out in the open water where there is more current and more plankton.

The other difference is that this species does not have the typical black stripes of other butterfly species. Instead, they have a large triangular shaped white patch on either side. Young fish have lighter coloured heads, and they darken as they mature.

At dusk, this large school of fish disperses – each individual fish wanders off over the reef looking for a small hole to use as a hiding place for the night while they sleep. Just before entering the hole they change colour – the bright white patch fades away and turns dark, making them less visible to nocturnal hunters such as sharks and moray eels.

How Pyramid Butterfly fish communicate

Scientists have only recently discovered that just before they head off to find their nighttime refuge, and only at this time, they communicate with one another. How? By sound! Yes…many fish are able to make sounds by using their air bladders and the muscles that surround it like a drum. So the next time you do a dusk dive or snorkel, listen carefully to these beautiful little Pyramid Butterflyfish.

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Learn more about other sea creatures you’ll see when diving at Halaveli: