Leading winemaker Patrick Léon to visit Constance Ephélia

We have invited leading winemaker, Patrick Léon, to Constance Ephélia in the Seychelles to share with guests his expertise and passion at a wine tasting lunch on 13 March.

Leading winemaker Patrick Léon to visit the Cyann restaurant

Leading winemaker Patrick Léon to visit the Cyann restaurant

With a stellar career in the wine industry spanning 40 years including managing director for Baron Phillipe de Rothschild, consulting oenologist at Château D’Esclans and running his own vineyard in Bordeaux, Château Le Trois Croix, Léon has earned a first class reputation for wine making.

Guests at Ephélia will have the opportunity to meet Léon at a lavish wine tasting lunch at Cyann where they can enjoy wines selected by him from Château d’Esclans and his own Château Les Trois Croix.

Find out more

 

 

The Culture Trip applauds Le Prince Maurice

Global art, culture and travel website, The Culture Trip, has picked out Constance Le Prince Maurice as one of the ‘10 best cultural hotels in Mauritius’.

Tables with a view

La Barachois at Constance Le Prince Maurice

The Culture Trip, which highlights cultural attractions around the world, also features Le Prince Maurice’s Le Barachois restaurant in its ‘Mauritius’ 10 best cultural restaurants’ guide.

The Culture Trip says, ‘A luxurious hotel situated on a peaceful private peninsula, Le Prince Maurice is an oasis of beauty and quality in the midst of luxuriant vegetation and next to a natural marine reserve’.

In its search for ‘Creole haute cuisine in the Indian Ocean’, it praises Le Barachois. ‘Located on the shore and surrounded by mangrove trees, diners can expect to eat off wooden tables on floating decks, whilst their food is prepared in a thatched stone cottage. This combination of colonial atmosphere with tropical luxury is distinctively Mauritian.’

To read the full review or to find out more about the cultural attractions in Mauritius visit The Culture Trip

Read more

 

Recipe: Tuna ravioli with semi-ripe papaya

Created at Constance Lémuria in 2006, this tuna ravioli dish uses 100% Seychelles products (papaya, tuna, palm kernel). Since then, our guests have forbidden us to remove the dish from the menu.

Constance Lémuria's Tuna Ravioli

Constance Lémuria’s Tuna Ravioli

Ingredients (Serves 4)

Fish and papaya compote:

  • 1kg yellow fin tuna loin
  • 1 semi-ripe papaya
  • 10g honey
  • 1 tea bag

1. Cut the tuna into 0.5cm thick slices, flatten them gently and set the aside. Make a small tartar with the trimmings from the tuna.

2. Peel the papaya and dice it into 0.5cm pieces. Store it.

3. Heat the honey in a small saucepan, add the papaya and the tea bag, and cook for 5 minutes. Drain and cool it in a chiller. Store it.

4. Spread twelve thin slices of tuna on the work surface. Add a teaspoon of papaya compote, then another twelve slices of tuna.

5. Using a three-inch diameter pastry cutter, press down gently to form the ravioli. There should be no air inside. Take another cutter, this time four centimeters in diameter and cut the ravioli.

6. Set them out on a plate with cling film over it, and put them in the fridge.

The garnish:

The smoked kernel:

  • 1/2 heart of palm kernel, fresh
  • Filao shavings: as required
  • Juice of 1 lime
  • Coconut oil: as required
  • Salt/pepper

1. Peel and cut the edible part of the palm and drop it onto a smoke-rack for 10 minutes.

2. Cut out twelve one-inch-thick cylinders. Add the coconut oil, lime juice, salt and pepper.

The vanilla oil:

  • 1 vanilla pod
  • Olive oil: as required
  • Lime juice: as required

1. Split the vanilla pod and keep the seeds.

2. Put the oil and lemon juice in a bowl, add the vanilla and whisk well. Store it.

The rocket and coconut salad:

  • 100g rocket
  • 1/2 dry coconut
  • 80g ripe papaya

1. Use a peeler to get some coconut shavings. Store them.

2. Wash the rocket and store it.

3. Cut the papaya into cubes and store it.

Finishing and presentation

Arrange three slices of palm on a square plate. On each of them, place a tuna ravioli.

Arrange the seasoned tuna tartar in the middle of the plate with some small capers, and finish it off with the rocket salad, the shaved dry coconut and diced papaya.

Top it off with vanilla oil on the ravioli and a little salt.

Sommelier’s suggested wine

Bold white woody wine:

  • Châteauneuf-du-Pape, Vieilles Vignes, Château de Beaucastel, 2009 France
  • hemel-en-Aarde Valley, Hamilton Russell Chardonnay, 2009 South Africa

Read more

 

5 unusual foods from Madagascar

Food in Madagascar is a gently spiced fusion of African, European and Asian culinary traditions creating a national cuisine unlike any other.

Foods from Madagascar: Royal romazava

Foods from Madagascar: Royal romazava

Here are 5 Malagasy dishes you’re unlikely to find beyond its beautiful shores.

Romazava

This is the national dish of Madagascar – a kind of stew made from zebu (beef), and sometimes pork. The meat is sautéed with ginger, garlic, tomato and onion and then left to simmer until ready to serve. It is usually served with a vary (rice) dish and sakay (a hot red pepper sauce). Check out our recipe for Royal Romazava, served at Constance Tsarabanjina.

Lasopy

This is a rich vegetable soup flavoured with veal bones. The bones are taken out before serving and the soup pureed and served in thick earthenware bowls.

Varenga

This delicious meat dish is made from slowly boiling beef with garlic and onion until it can be easily shredded and then roasted.

Vary amid ‘anana

A lightly spiced rice and vegetable dish in which the rice is cooked at the same time as a variety of vegetables, it may also sometimes include meat or fish. Again the Madagascans like to eat this with sakay pepper sauce.

Salady Voankazo

This is a popular dessert in Madagascar taking advantage of any fruit which happens to be in season including bananas, mangos, pineapples as well as strawberries and lychees. The fruit is cut up and served with a sweet syrup and vanilla extract.

Read more

 

 

Recipe: Maldives chapatti and banana puri

The chapatti is from the same family as the rotis, the famous Indian breads eaten on every street corner of the subcontinent. These loaves emerged in the sixteenth century in Indian and their recipe has hardly changed since.

Constance Halavel's chapatti & banana puri recipe

Constance Halavel’s chapatti & banana puri recipe

This recipe from Constance Halaveli, is a modernised version of the original classic.

Ingredients (Serves 4)

Chapatti:

  • 1 cup whole wheat flour
  • 1 cup white flour
  • 1 teaspoon olive oil
  • 3/4 cup hot water
  • 1 pinch of salt

1. In a bowl, mix together the flour and salt, and using a wooden spatula, stir it while adding the olive oil and hot water. You will get a soft elastic dough, but not sticky.

2. On a lightly-floured worktop, knead the dough until it is smooth and fluffy.

3. Divide it into 10 equal portions, or fewer if you want larger loaves. Roll them into balls and let them rest for a few minutes.

Banana puri:

  • 30g flour
  • 30g salt
  • 20g pepper
  • 40g ripe bananas
  • 2 tablespoons water
  • 60ml milk
  • Ghee vegetable butter plant: to taste

1. Make a firm but pliable dough and cover it with a damp cloth for 30 minutes.

2. Knead the dough gently. it should be firm enough to be able to spread without sticking.

3. Divide it into small balls and cover them with a damp cloth.

4. take a ball of dough, dip at an angle in a mixture of Ghee and oil and spread it into a round 13cm diameter shape. Do the same with the rest of the puris.

Finishing and presentation

The chapattis:

Heat a griddle and lightly grease it. Using a rolling pin, roll out the balls. They must be quite thin, like tortillas. When the griddle starts to smoke, add the chapatti and cook for about 30 seconds to produce a brown colour. Turn it over and cook it in the same way. Continue with the rest of the dough.

Banana puris:

Heat a wok filled with oil to 200˚C. Dip the puris in the oil. Using a slotted spoon, and while shaking them, make the puris rise by covering them with hot oil. This operation lasts only a few seconds. Turn the puris over and continue cooking then so that they go a nice golden brown colour.

Sommelier’s suggested wine

White aromatic wine:

  • Alsace Pinot blanc, “Mise de Printemps”, Josmeyer, 2009 France
  • Stellenbosch Neethlingshof, Gewürztraminer, 2010 South Africa.

Read more

 

Recipe: Lemongrass prawns

It’s not difficult to succumb to these large lemongrass prawns, juicy, highly desired and fragrant as they are. Created in the kitchens at Constance Ephélia, the idea occurred to our chef while travelling in Thailand.

He loved the famous Tom Yam Kung, but the broth was too powerful for the European palate, and the texture of the seafood was not highlighted enough. This personal and tasty version is enjoyed by alternating a mouthful of prawns with a sip of broth.

Constance Ephélia's lemongrass prawns

Constance Ephélia’s lemongrass prawns

Ingredients (Serves 4)

The seafood:

  • 12 black tiger prawns (size U 10)
  • 1 orange
  • 1 tomato
  • 200g lemongrass
  • 1 ginger root
  • 1 kaffir lime leaf
  • Olive oil: as required
  • Salt/pepper

1. Shell the prawn tails keeping the heads for the shellfish broth. Store it.

2. Put the heads together with the orange that has been cut in half into a saucepan along with the tomato. Cover it with water and cook for 25 minutes on a low heat.

3. Sieve this broth through a cheesecloth strainer to remove the impurities.

4. Wash and slice the lemon. Peel and finely cut the ginger root. Let them steep for 5 minutes with a kaffir leaf in the shellfish consommé. Strain the consommé and keep it warm.

The garnish:

  • 1 red pepper (capsicum)
  • 100g mange-tout peas
  • 2 carrots
  • 1 white turnip
  • 1 red chilli pepper

1. Take the stalks off the mange-tout peas. Wash and chop them finely lengthways. Store them.

2. Peel the carrots then wash and cut them with a mandolin cutter into thin 3mm-thick slices, then into julienne slices. Put them in a bowl with iced water.

3. Follow the same procedure for the turnip.

4. Cut the red capsicum pepper in half and remove the seeds. Using a food processor, remove the skin and chop it finely. Store it.

5. Wash the red chilli pepper and cut it finely.

6. Drain all the vegetables and put them together in a bowl. Mix them well. Add some red pepper and serve separately in small bowls. Add a drizzle of olive oil.

Finishing and presentation

Whichever is more convenient for you, grill or pan-fry the prawns.

Serve the lemongrass tea in a teapot, and the bowls of crispy salad vegetables separately.

Sommelier’s suggested wine

Dry white wine:

  • Pernand-Vergelesses, 1er Cru “Sous-Frétilles”, Deux Montille, 2008 France
  • Chablis 1er Cru “Vaucoupin”, Corinne et Jean-Pierre Grossot, 2008 France.

Read more