Recipe: Chicken Tandoori Marinade

Cumin seeds

Cumin seeds

This week Siddq, our Sous Chef at Jahaz Restaurant, Constance Halaveli, brings you his special homemade recipe for Tandoori Chicken Marinade.

Ingredients

  • 1 large chicken
  • 5g cumin seeds
  • 5g coriander seeds
  • 20g garam masala
  • 8g chilli powder
  • 4 tbsp plain yoghurt
  • 1 tsp lime juice
  • 1 tbsp garlic and ginger paste
  • salt and pepper to taste
     

1. Pre-heat your oven to 220 C
2. Prepare the ground cumin and coriander. Take your cumin and coriander seeds and toast over a medium heat until the spices become very fragrant and brown a little. Remove from the heat and cool to room temperature. When the toasted spices have cooled grind them in a pestle and mortar to a fine powder, reserve until needed.
3. Make the garlic and ginger paste - simply puree 50% fresh peeled ginger and 50% fresh peeled garlic. Mix together. This keeps for up to 7 days in the fridge if stored in an air tight container.
4. Blend all the ingredients from the recipe together, season to taste with salt and pepper, reserve.
5. Take 1 large chicken and completely remove the skin. Make 3 slices diagonally across both breasts and thighs approx 5 mm deep. This helps the marinade to penetrate and also ensures that your chicken will cook evenly. Then coat the chicken well with your Tandoori marinade.
6. Place chicken on a tray in the oven and leave until the edges almost blacken, when you see this colour change, lower the oven temperature to 180C and continue cooking until the internal temperature of the meat has reached 74 C. When cooking chicken, allow 20 minutes per 500g + an additional 20 minutes at the end.
7. Alternatively, you can cook the chicken on the BBQ.

Every Friday we publish tasty recipes from the Indian Ocean. If you’ve got a favourite dish from your holidays with Constance Hotels, get in contact with us and let us know which recipe you want us to feature next.

You can get in contact with us via Twitter, post photos to Facebook or use the comments section below.

Michelin star chef Serge Gouloumès visits Constance Lémuria and Ephélia

Chef Serge Gouloumes

Chef Serge Gouloumes

World class Chef Serge Gouloumès is cooking up a feast at our resorts in the Seychelles this week.

The Michelin star chef from Relais & Châteaux, Le Mas Candille in Mougins, France is visiting Constance Lémuria and Constance Ephélia from 17-21 October. Restaurant Candille is known as one of the best restaurants on the Cote d’Azur.

Special menus are being prepared at Lémuria and Ephélia, so guests can experience Serge Gouloumès’ culinary talent and passion for cooking.

Here’s a taste of what’s on offer this week: 

Monday 17 October 2011

Candlelit dinner at the Seahorse restaurant

  • Amuse Bouche 
  • Candille Foie Gras Tatin with Armagnac
  • Rock lobster roasted in its shell, simmeredSoissonsbeans smoked with tarragon
  • Exotic ilot, coconut caviar flavoured with vanilla, marinated & roasted Victoria pineapple, mango sorbet on chocolate notes

Tuesday 18 October 2011

Constance Lemuria Seahorse restaurant

Constance Lemuria Seahorse restaurant

Gala dinner at the Seahorse restaurant

  • Amuse Bouche
  • Braised white cabbage leaves, flacked crab, full-flavoured sea juice
  • Scallops skewer, celery mash with lardo di Colonata, Parmigiano Reggiano crisps
  • Glazed slab of Angus fillet, tataki sauce, butternut squash cubes, grilled leek, fried onions
  • Hazelnut macaroon, white chocolate ganache with winter truffle, caramelised pecan nuts, praline ice cream

Thursday 20 & Friday 21 October 2011

Constance Ephelia, Cyann restaurant

Constance Ephelia, Cyann restaurant

 

Dinner at Cyann restaurant

  • Amuse Bouche
  • Egg in truffle surprise, wild mushroom duxelles, chervil foam
  • Scallops skewer, sweet chestnut biscuit and purée, braised endives with mandarin juice
  • Duckling fillet in mild spiced glaze, wok-sautéed vegetables with coriander
  • Exotic ilot, coconut caviar flavoured with vanilla, marinated & roasted Victoria pineapple, mango sorbet on chocolate notes 

Friday 21 October 2011

Special lunch at Cyann restaurant

Four hands special menu by the Chefs Serge Gouloumès and Denis Jean-Jacques.

•        Surprise menu

Recipe: Ginger-flavoured peanut chatini

Fresh root ginger

Fresh root ginger

This delicious chatini is similar to a chutney. Super tasty, it’s very quick and easy to prepare. Serve with tropical fish and meat dishes, particularly curries.

Serves 4
Preparation time: 10 minutes
Cooking time: 10 minutes

Ingredients:

  • 400g shelled peanuts, skins removed
  • 250g watermelon flesh
  • 1 clove garlic
  • 5 sprigs coriander
  • 1 fresh green chilli
  • 3 tbsp lemon juice
  • 2 lemongrass stalks
  • 1 tbsp finely chopped ginger
  • salt and pepper

1. Toast the peanuts for 10 minutes in a 180ºC oven.
2. Gather all the ingredients in the bowl of a food processor and blend into a smooth paste. Check seasoning.
3. Store in the fridge until needed.

This recipe appears in our book, ’100% Mauritius – 52 recipes from the Prince Maurice’. You can buy the recipe book from our online store.

How to: aerate and decant wine

Our Head Sommelier at Constance, Jérome Faure, takes you through the steps to aerate and decant wine.

Decanted wine

Decanted wine

There’s a French word, carafage, which you probably won’t find in any dictionary even though it’s regularly used by wine experts and enthusiasts. For some, it simply means ‘pouring the contents of a bottle into a carafe’.

There are 2 ways that explain the why and how of carafage – to aerate (or let wine breathe) and to decant.

Aerating wine

Aerating is used with a young wine. Some wines need to be allowed to breathe to be at their best. Full-bodied young wines as well as certain types of wine made from particular grape varieties such as chardonnays, rieslings and pinots (blanc and gris) need to be aerated so they can flourish.

There are other wines that don’t need aerating, such as sauvignons. Wines with an oaky flavour and wines with a musty taste (gout de reduit) benefit from being transferred into a carafe, as do wines with a slight effervescence.

Aeration is also good for wines that taste strongly of tannin, to soften its impact.

Decanting wine

White wine in a glass

Letting the wine breathe

Decanting is used for wines of a certain age (usually 10 years or older) to separate the liquid from any sediment, or solid particles.

But decanting aged wine isn’t always appropriate because some old wines simply can’t take the process. The purpose of decanting isn’t oxygenation, quite the opposite in fact.

Choosing the right carafe

Even though some people are of the opinion that only red wines need decanting – when in fact white wines may need it more often – it’s always good to bear in mind that each wine is unique and requires a particular kind of carafe.

For aerating wine, it’s best to use a carafe with a broad base and a wide neck so that the wine has plenty of contact with the air. The more full-bodied the wine, the more important aeration becomes – so the carafe should be flatter and broader. The aim is to bring the wine into contact with the air.

However, an old wine needs to be handled with care, and requires a carafe with a narrow neck and fairly narrow base.

When choosing a carafe, also ask yourself these questions:

  • will the shape of the neck allow you to pour the wine easily into a glass?
  • is it a carafe that can be easily handled?
  • will the carafe be easy to wash and dry?
  • is it a carafe that will be really stable when filled with wine and placed on the table?

Find out more

If you’ve got any specific questions about this topic, you can contact us via Twitter, Facebook or use the comments section below.

Recipe: Fruity tropical dessert with white chocolate

Bring paradise to your home with this delicious fruity dessert. Guaranteed to pep up the finale to a weekend dinner party.

Beach Deck at Le Prince Maurice

Beach Deck at Le Prince Maurice

Serves 4
Preparation time: 1 hour
Marinating time: 20 minutes
Cooking time: 20 minutes
Freezing time: 1 hour
Refrigerating time: 1 hour

Ingredients:

  • 2 mangoes
  • juice and grated zest of 2 limes
  • pulp and seeds of 2 passion fruit

For the custard:

  • 10cl milk
  • 10cl crème fraîche
  • 40g sugar
  • 3 egg yolks
  • 1/4 vanilla pod

For the white chocolate mousse:

  • 150g white chocolate
  • 1 leaf gelatin
  • 15g chilled whipping cream

For the coconut croustillant

  • 60g grated coconut
  • 70g syrup (made from 40g sugar boiled with 30cl water)

1. To make the custard: in a saucepan, scald the milk with crème fraîche and vanilla, then remove from heat.
2. Meanwhile, briskly whisk the egg yolks with the sugar. Pour the hot milk on the sugar-yolks mixture, whisk well, pour this back into the saucepan and cook on low heat, stirring with a spatula until thickened. Remove from heat, pour custard through a sieve and keep 100g aside for the mousse.
3. Make the white chocolate mousse: soak the gelatine in a bowl of cold water. Finely chop the white chocolate with a knife.
4. After 10 minutes, drain the gelatine and squeeze it between your fingers to remove moisture. Incorporate it to the warm custard, then pour the custard onto the chocolate and mix until smooth and creamy.
5. In a chilled bowl, whip the chilled cream until stiff. Fold this whipped cream into the chocolate cream, cover with clingfilm and refrigerate for 1 hour.
6. Wash the mangoes, peel them and finely slice them with a sharp knife. Let them macerate in a dish for 20 minutes with the lime juice and grated zest.
7. Make the coconut croustillant: mix grated coconut with syrup to make a thick paste. Spread this paste between 2 sheets of parchment paper and roll it out as thinly as possible. Deep-freeze for 1 hour until very hard.
8. Peel off the top sheet of parchment paper and bake the coconut croustillant for 20 minutes in a 160ºC oven, checking often so that it doesn’t burn.
9. Use a tablespoon to drop a little white chocolate mousse into a stemmed glass. Place a few well-drained slices of mango on top. Cover with white chocolate mousse and top again with mango slices.
10. Break pieces of coconut croustillant and stick them into the mousse. Sprinkle with passion fruit pulp and seeds, and serve well chilled.

 

 

Exciting new menu at Jing, Constance Halaveli

Jing restaurant

Fabulous setting at Jing

Awaken the senses with a tantalising new menu at Jing, our South East Asian restaurant at Constance Halaveli.

The new menu has been inspired by the fresh flavours from South East Asia coupled with modern day cooking techniques. Our chef will take you on an intrepid culinary journey of discovery.

Here’s a sneak peek at what’s on offer:

  • Waldoff Made Over –  a modern twist on a classic salad
  • Lobster Bisque – rock lobster croquette & warm artichoke salad
  • Asian Mushroom Soup – summer truffles with Shimeji & Pencil Asparagus
  • Red Thai Curry Cappuncino – a Jing signature red thai curry soup with coconut air
  • Seared Diver Scallops – with Teriyaki Risotto and Hijiki & Kaffir Lime Cloud
  • Soya Raviolli Alaskan King Crab & Sevruga Caviar
  • Roasted Kumera & Ginger Gnocchi – kumera is a native New Zealand sweet potato
  • Garlic & Curry Leaf Spiced Chicken Sous Vide – this dish requires a special cooking method called Sous Vide. It cooks in a warm water bath for approximately 1 hour to deliver succulent tender meat.
  • Textures of Apple, 5 different ways to have an apple – apple as gelée, apple sorbet, apple espuma, apple compote and apple crumble.

Jing - the perfect venue for a taste discovery.