Match food with fine wines at Constance Le Prince Maurice

Take inspiration from Le Prince Maurice, and match food with fine wines, selected from the hotel’s extensive wine cellar.

The wine cellar at Constance Le Prince Maurice

The wine cellar at Constance Le Prince Maurice

1. Springfield Estate, ‘Life from Stone’, Sauvignon Blanc, 2011, Robertson region, South Africa

This Sauvignon Blanc has an expressive nose with exotic fruit flavours of passion fruit, pineapple and hints of grapefruit. It is crispy in the mouth, full of minerals with a citrus fruit aftertaste.

Food pairing

Albacore tuna carpaccio, celeriac and preserved lemon

2. Mullineux White Blend, Chris and Andrea Mullineux, 2011, Swartland Region, South Africa

This has a glorious nose of apricot, peach and honey, a harmonious blend with a beautiful complexity and a lemony freshness and fruitiness.

Food pairing

Faye faye crab millefeuille and victoria pineapple with coconut dressing.

3. Felton Road, Chardonnay, ‘Bannockbum’ 2010, Central Otago, New Zealand

The nose expresses top notes of white peach and cashew followed by a hint of toasted oak. Rich mouth filling flavours of white peach followed by some spicy taste, a touch of citrus and creamy in texture with a long aftertaste.

Food pairing

Grouper fillet cooked on a low temperature, creamy mussel marinière and local river watercress puree.

Laguna Bar, Constance Le Prince Maurice

Laguna Bar, Constance Le Prince Maurice

4. Vuurberg Red, Rall Donovan, 2009, Stellenbosch region, South Africa

Incredible concentration with intense fruit and structure in the mouth. Lots of cassis and spicy, leather notes with a firm tannin structure and the potential to evolve beautifully. Decanting recommended.

Food pairing

Roasted duck breast from the South Island with herbal flavours, sautéed sweet potato and pumpkin with braised mushrooms.

5. St Emillon Château Tertre Roteboeuf, Grand Cru Classé, 2004, Bordeaux Region, France

With floral notes and black fruit aromas this is charming and elegant in the mouth. It has a very fruity and caressing taste with soft tannin, excellent balance and a splendid finish.

Food pairing

Strips of foie gras and Australian beef tenderloin, pan-fried exquise potatoes from the South, oyster mushroom and onion pickles.

Wine cellar at Constance Le Prince Maurice

For more inspiration guests at Le Prince Maurice can visit the wine cellar and join our sommeliers for a wine tasting where you can sample a selection of some of the best wines from the new and old world.

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Fresh juice recipes

If the mercury’s rising where you are, quench your thirst with this selection of our healthy fresh juice recipes from Constance Halaveli.

Fuji Power

Fuji Power

For each recipe, use fresh fruit and juice where possible. Add all ingredients to the blender before adding ice if preferred.

Lemon cooler

2 stalks Lemongrass, cut into pieces
125 ml Grapefruit juice
125 ml Watermelon juice
20ml Honey & saffron syrup

Fuji power

125 ml Orange juice
125 ml Pineapple juice
10cm Ginger
20-30g Fuji berries

Watermelon breakfast smoothie

Watermelon breakfast smoothie

Carrot cocktail

125ml Carrot juice
125 ml Pineapple juice
125ml Orange juice
2 tsp Honey

Watermelon breakfast smoothie

720g Chopped watermelon
2tsp Lime juice
1-2 cm Ginger
10-15 Fresh mint leaves

Try our detox juices and find out more about Constance Halaveli, Maldives

The Moray Eel – love them or loathe them?

Marine biologist and guest blogger Robin Aiello takes a look at the much maligned Moray Eel in this month’s creature feature.

The Moray Eel

The Moray Eel

Robin will be returning to Constance Halaveli in September 2013, to run further dive courses and talks following her hugely popular visit earlier in the year.

You either love moray eels, or fear them.

Over the years moray eels have gained an unearned reputation as an aggressive, ferocious animal. In truth, however, they are reclusive and shy, preferring to flee or hide from divers by pulling into reef crevices.

How the moray breathes

Despite their long, snake-like appearance, moray eels are fish – not snakes. And like all fish, they need to have fresh seawater pass over their gills to breath. But, since morays are relatively sedentary fish, hiding in ambush to catch prey like crabs, octopus and fish, they have developed another way to ‘breathe’ – they gulp water by opening and closing their mouths. Many people misinterpret this behaviour as ferocious and a sign of aggression – but it is merely the eel’s way of breathing.

Their elongated, serpentine shape allows these fish to swim through the complex reef framework of nooks and crannies. To avoid getting cut and scraped by sharp coral, they produce huge amounts of mucus to coat their smooth, scaleless skin.

Marine biologist, Robin Aiello

Marine biologist, Robin Aiello

How moray eels catch their prey

When you look at the head of a moray eel their ‘beady’ little eyes seem disproportionately small. In fact, morays have very poor eyesight, and are nearly blind. So how do they find their food? By following their nose. They have a highly developed sense of smell and large tubular nostrils for smelling prey. They also have very good hearing, which helps them to hunt.

But what I personally think is the most amazing thing about morays eels is how they catch and eat their prey. In addition to several rows of razor sharp teeth, these fish have a unique weapon that, so far, scientists have not found in any other animal – a second set of jaws!

These jaws, called pharyngeal jaws, lie inside the fish’s throat, and when the mouth is opened to attack, they are propelled forward into the mouth to grasp the prey. As the mouth closes again, they pull back into the throat, taking the prey with them! How weird and amazing is that?

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Marine biologist journeys to the Arctic North

Marine biologist Robin Aiello visited Constance Halaveli earlier this year, where she ran a number of dive courses and talks. Currently in the Arctic North, Robin writes about her latest expedition.

Walrus' relaxing in the Arctic

Walrus’ relaxing in the Arctic

Greetings from the far north – the land of polar bears and walrus

I can assure you that right now, having just spent the past 8 hours driving a small rubber boat though thick sea ice in -1°C temperatures, I am dreaming of the warm tropical waters of Halaveli in the Maldives.

Expedition in Svalbard

I am up here in Svalbard, in the far North, above 79º latitude, working as the marine biologist on-board an expedition ship that is spending three months exploring the Arctic. So far, the season has been wonderful.

Polar bears and ice caps

The other day we started the morning with a male polar bear walking leisurely past our ship as we drifted in thick sea ice that spreads out as far as the eye can see. Polar bears are amazing animals with their huge paws, shaggy white coat of fur and piercing black eyes. They are just so regal and elegant – kings of the ice.

A Polar Bear

A Polar Bear

Later in the day we visited a beach with a dozen or so walrus hauled out. They are so funny – they lie for long periods of time doing absolutely nothing, then suddenly one will wiggle around, which starts a whole flurry of activity as they raise their heads, knock into one another with their tusks, until they slowly find a more comfortable position and settle back down to sleep some more.

As beautiful and dramatic as the scenery here is, I cannot wait to return to Halaveli in September to dive and snorkel the amazing reefs.

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Polar Bear

Up close and personal

 

Admiring the reflection

Admiring the reflection

 

A stroll on the ice

A stroll on the ice

Architecture and design at Tsarabanjina

The unique island hideaway of Constance Tsarabanjina, Madagascar is a place where barefoot chic sits comfortably beside the island’s distinctive biodiversity.

Beach Villa at Constance Tsarabanjina

Beach Villa at Constance Tsarabanjina

The seemingly effortless blending of traditional Malagasy building techniques with the comforts of a modern luxury hotel is part of a conscious effort to maintain Tsarabanjina’s natural Robinson Crusoe charm.

In Malagasy culture it is believed that the invisible spirit world is a part of our world, and it has been our mission in refurbishing the resort to protect the unique, invisible, free spirit of the island.

History of Tsarabanjina

Tsarabanjina was originally discovered in 1990 by a South African adventurer, Richard Walker, who fell in love with the island and wanted to share it with others.

In 1998 he built a small resort with eight bungalows which integrated with their natural environment so that guests could enjoy the island’s authentic charm.

In 2006 he handed over guardianship of the beautiful island and its resort to Constance. This is a responsibility that we take very seriously and one which was at the heart of our plans when we decided to refurbish the existing resort to introduce a little luxury for guests in this special place.

Beach Villa, Tsarabanjina

Beach Villa, Tsarabanjina

Architects behind Tsarabanjina

In an effort to protect the authenticity of Tsarabanjina we selected architects who understood our respect for the ecological integrity of the place. We then went further to embrace the local culture by introducing Malagasy arts and crafts into the design of the hotel.

When choosing the materials for the construction of the resort our first decision was easy, we banned all plastic. We then searched for locally sourced wood from the main island and used it in its raw form to give guests a sensory connection to the nature that surrounds them here.

Working with local crafts people

Throughout the refurbishment we have tried to use local crafts people who have traditions of construction, basketry, weaving, embroidery which have been handed down from generation to generation.

We believe that in employing local crafts people we are not just supporting a local economy but promoting a passing down of traditional, cultural skills.

The result is an island where luxury tourism sits comfortably alongside authentic Malagasy charm and tradition in such a way that the natural environment is added to rather than impacted.

Unlike other resorts our luxuries are discreet rather than ostentatious. We prefer to highlight the island’s natural beauty and relaxed pace so that guests can enjoy the same authentic experience here that they always have.

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MCB Tour Championship 2013

Keep up-to-date with all the news from the Senior Tour leading up to this year’s MCB Tour Championship.

Legend Golf Course, Constance Belle Mare Plage

Legend Golf Course, Constance Belle Mare Plage

The MCB Tour Championship website includes the latest news, player profiles, scores, calendar of events and history of the championship.

The MCB Tour Championship, to be held 9-15 December in Mauritius at Constance Belle Mare Plage, is the final event in the Senior Tour calendar.

Take part in the championship

Amateurs eager to get in the action of this prestigious golfing event can now apply through the entry form posted on the website. Entries are being accepted for the Constance Hotels Pro Am (11-12 Dec 2013) and the Air Mauritius Trophy (9,10,14 Dec).

Find out more